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Cupboard Storage Times

Cooking Temperatures
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Storing and Freezing Cookies

Overloaded Refrigerator?

Refrigerator and Freezer Storage Times

Source: Taste of Home - Home Cooked Recipes

Storing Chocolate

 

Keep refrigerator temperature between 34 degrees and 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep foods wrapped or placed in airtight containers, unless otherwise noted, to keep food from drying out and odors from transferring to other foods. Meats should be kept in the coldest part of the refrigerator and vegetables stored in the crisper.

Keep your freezer set at 0 degrees Fahrenheit for storage that is longer than a week or two. Always wrap foods in heavy-duty foil or freezer paper, or place in freezer containers to guard against freezer burn.

Label and date all foods that go into the freezer so it is easy to identify the packages and use within the recommended dates. [Another option is to put the "use by" date on the package when you freeze it. Then you won't have to figure it out when you take it out later.] For large freezers, make an inventory list that includes the date each item was placed in the freezer. Then post it on the freezer door for quick reference.

High-Altitude Cooking

If you live in a high-altitude area and are unsure of the adjustments you might need to make in your recipes, consult your local county Extension Office for Assistance.

 

 

Store your eggs properly.

 

 

Overloaded refrigerators are an invitation to food poisoning!

The latest research shows that 88 per cent of cases of domestic food poisoning result when people are catering for larger numbers than usual. Cramming food into the refrigerator and constantly opening the door can cause the internal temperature to rise.
  • Check the temperature of your refrigerator from time to time using a refrigerator thermometer. If it's between 32F (0C) and 40F (5C), the germs that can cause illness can't multiply. 
     
  • Hot foods should be cooled quickly before placing in the refrigerator or the refrigerator temperature will rise.
     
  • All food in the refrigerator should be covered.
     
  • Store raw and ready to eat food separately with raw foods on the bottom shelves and ready to eat above.
     
  • Food should be eaten before its 'Use by' or 'Best before' dates.
     
  • Defrost (if applicable) your refrigerator regularly to help it operate efficiently.

 

 

 
Storing Chocolate:
 
You should store your chocolate tightly-wrapped in a cool dry place. Preferably the temperature should get no higher than 75 degrees F in the summer and no lower than 60 degrees F in the winter. If absolutely necessary, during the summer, chocolate can be stored in the refrigerator. However, be sure it is double-wrapped and in a plastic zipper-type bag (with all the air pressed out. Chocolate will absorb odors from other foods if not properly wrapped.
 
Chocolate and moisture do not mix. High humidity or moisture may cause a white haze or spots on the surface of the chocolate. (This is known as "moisture bloom".) The chocolate will not look as appetizing, but it will generally be just as tasty.
 
In general, solid chocolate which is not mixed with other products will have a shelf life of at least six to twelve months or longer, depending on the environmental storage conditions. When mixed with other products (nuts, cream, etc.) the shelf life will be reduced.

  Jump To: Meats | Poultry | Dairy and Fish

Food

Refrigerator

Freezer

Fresh Meat

Chops (lamb)

3 to 5 days

4 to 6 months

Chops (pork)

3 to 5 days

4 to 6 months

Ground, stew meats

1 to 2 days

3 to 4 months

Roasts (beef)

3 to 5 days

6 to 12 months

Roasts (lamb)

3 to 5 days

4 to 6 months

Roasts (pork, veal)

3 to 5 days

4 to 6 months

Sausage (fresh pork)

1 to 2 days

1 to 2 months

Steaks

3 to 5 days

6 to 12 months

Cooked Meats

Cooked meat, meat dishes

3 to 4 days

2 to 3 months

Processed Meats

Bacon

1 week*

1 to 2 months

Frankfurters

1 week*

1 to 2 months

Ham (Fully Cooked, Half)

3 to 5 days

1 to 2 months

Luncheon Meats

3 to 5 days*

1 to 2 months

Sausage (Smoked)

1 week

1 to 2 months

Fresh Poultry

Refrigerator

Freezer

Chicken, Turkey (Whole)

1 to 2 days

1 year

Chicken Pieces

1 to 2 days

9 months

Duck, Goose (Whole)

1 to 2 days

1 year

Turkey Pieces

1 to 2 days

9 months

Cooked Poultry

Covered with broth or gravy

1 to 2 days

6 months

Pieces not in broth or gravy

3 to 4 days

4 months

Cooked Casseroles

3 to 4 days

4 to 6 months

Eggs

Refrigerator

Freezer

Whites

2 to 4 days

12 months

Whole Eggs (Fresh in Shell)

3 weeks

Can't Freeze

Yolks

2 to 4 days

12 months

Cheese

Cottage Cheese

5 days

Can't Freeze

Hard Cheese

3 to 4 months

6 months

Soft Cheese

2 weeks

4 months

Ice Cream

Can't Refrigerate

1 to 3 months

Butter, Margarine

1 month

3 to 6 months

Fish

1 to 2 days

3 to 6 months

*Dates apply to opened vacuum-sealed packages. Unopened vacuum-sealed packages can be stored in the refrigerator for 2 weeks or until "use by" or "sell by" date expires.

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